Trainer Tom Dascombe shocked by Michael Owen split

Trainer Tom Dascombe has spoken of his "complete shock" as a 12-year tie-in with Michael Owen's Manor House Stables came to an end.

Tom Dascombe threw some light on the split from Michael Owen's Manor House stables, labelling it on Thursday as a "complete shock".

Dascombe, who had spells with Martin Pipe, Ralph Beckett and Mike de Kock before striking out on his own, has enjoyed a successful spell at the helm.

His biggest success came through Brown Panther, winner of the Irish St Leger in 2014, while he has also tasted victory at Royal Ascot, trained popular sprinter Kachy and won the Ayr Gold Cup with Angel Alexander.

In a statement posted on his Twitter account, Owen said: "After more than 12 years as trainer, Tom Dascombe will be leaving Manor House Stables in the new year.

"We have shared many great times and races together and created memories that will last a lifetime.

"I would like to place on record my own personal thanks for all his hard work and support over the years. We part on great terms and everyone at MHS will miss him and wishes him the very best for the future."

However, Dascombe, who saddled Skittlebomz to victory in a six-furlong nursery at Southwell just hours after the news became public, says he was blindsided at the decision made by the former England striker.

The 48-year-old Dascombe said: "I only found out two days ago. I told my family yesterday. I told my staff this morning.

"I have absolutely no plans - I have no idea what I am going to do next, but I will be training next year from somewhere and we will train winners like we have just done there (at Southwell).

"It is as simple as that - life goes on.

"The fact that they don't want me to be here any more, that's their choice - it is not mine."

Dascombe has enjoyed many notable recent triumphs from the yard, including saddling Ever Given, who landed £98,000 for winning the Goffs UK Premier Yearling Stakes at York's Ebor meeting in August.

He added: "It was a complete shock. But that's it, I have had two days to think about it and I've just got to look after my staff, look after my owners, look after my horses and carry on the best I can.

"The fact that this news came just before Christmas is almost irrelevant, but I have tried to reassure all the staff that everybody else is fine, bar me.

"We will see what happens and I just have to carry on with life. We will get it sorted. There is no hope about it - we will get it sorted. I just don't know how or when."

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