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Joe Root believes he must keep 'evolving' as a batter after century in Ranchi

Joe Root believes he must keep "evolving" as a batter or risk being exposed after returning to form as England moved into the ascendancy against India in Ranchi.

Root's sparkling 122 not out ushered England from 112 for five to 353 all out in the fourth Test as the Yorkshireman ended a lean patch which had seen him collect just 77 runs in six previous innings.

A couple of attack-orientated dismissals brought scrutiny on whether Root needed to tailor his approach – one that has brought more than 11,000 Test runs – to suit England’s current 'Bazball' model.

But when asked whether he has been stung by recent criticism, Root gave an impassioned defence of England's style and insisted he must continue to develop to remain among the world's top-tier batters.

"Certainly the execution of the shots has weighed on me," the former England captain said. "Not necessarily the selection but the execution – I'm better than that.

"It's not about being arrogant. Bazball is a word that's used a lot but that’s your word, that's not how we look at it.

"It's about how can we get the best out of each other as a team. You're not always going to get it right (but) we'll continue to keep trying to improve.

"The reason I've played as many games as I have is that I've not wanted to stand still as a player, I have to try to keep evolving.

"If you keep on trying to play the same way over and over again, teams work you out and they find your weaknesses. If you don't try to get better and find different ways of scoring runs, you’ll get found out."

Root played a more traditional Test innings en route to his 31st hundred in the format before Shoaib Bashir exploited helpful conditions to finish with four for 84 as India closed on 219 for seven.

Root kept his reverse ramp out of sight and admitted a brief inkling of unfurling it to bring up three figures was quickly banished.

"It was a fleeting and selfish thought that left my mind very quickly," Root said. "You don't mess with the game, you just try and play what you honestly think is the best way to score runs.

"It was nice to finally get some runs in this series. It felt like it's been a long time coming.

"It's been disappointing but the fact I have got quite a lot of experience has been able to keep me calm. The way I'm preparing meant it was going to come at some point."

Bashir bowled 31 overs at one end in just his eighth first-class match and second Test, with the 20-year-old offering control and a wicket-taking threat on a pitch producing spin and uneven bounce.

Bashir was solely responsible for India lurching from 86 for one to 161 for five, which included the wicket of the in-form Yashasvi Jaiswal, who made 73 before bottom-edging on to his stumps.

"The way he bowls is a great little insight into his character and personality: he is quite cheeky and great fun to be around," Root said.

"To be able to continually put pressure on some very good players of spin, I know the wicket was helpful at times but he did an amazing job and it's a great sign for English cricket."

Bashir's success left Root "itching to get on" after only being called upon to bowl a single over.

But he added: "It's nice for Stokesy to be able to put so much trust in a young guy that's played so little Test cricket.

"You can see he wants it, he's desperate to do his part and and it was great to see him get rewards for that."

READ MORE: Rookie spinner Shoaib Bashir takes four wickets to put England in control of fourth Test in India

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