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Dawid Malan accepts his England career could be over, looking forward to future with Yorkshire

Dawid Malan accepts his time with England has likely run its course but is planning his future in cricket by taking the first steps towards a coaching career with Yorkshire.

Malan still has six months left to run on the England central contract he signed last October but, despite finishing last year's disappointing World Cup defence as top-scorer in a well beaten side, he is highly unlikely to wear the national team shirt again.

While not officially retired Malan's name was conspicuous by its absence from the squads which immediately followed the dire campaign in India and, after 92 limited-overs internationals and 22 Test caps, the 36-year-old is looking to the next chapter.

Having agreed a white-ball only deal at Headingley for 2024 he will spend the early part of the season on hand to help his fellow batters, from first-team level downwards, before returning to the playing fold for the Vitality Blast.

"It's quite exciting. I'll see if can share some of my knowledge, if anyone wants it, and find out if it's something I enjoy," he said.

"I still feel I've got two or three years of playing if things go well and I can still perform, but I want to give back as much as I can now. 

"It's exciting to be back and give myself a different kind of challenge at this time of year than the one I usually have.

"It's something I suggested to the club, because I've been thinking for a while about what I want to do after I'm finished. Do I want to get out totally or stay in cricket?

"Regardless of whether you earn £20million or £20,000 doing something, it's whether you enjoy it or not. I don’t know if I'd enjoy sitting in four walls and sitting on phones all day, so this is the perfect opportunity for me.

"It's an unofficial capacity but I'll throw some balls and speak to whoever wants to speak to me about batting without treading on any of the coaches’ toes."

Despite being midway through a year-long England deal, Malan is realistic enough not to pin his hopes on getting a comeback call for this summer's T20 World Cup in the West Indies and the United States of America.

"I had a chat the day after (the World Cup) and that's been it pretty much. They told me their reasons and that's fine," he said.

"I wouldn't say performance would have anything to do with it. In 2023 I had a pretty good year in 50-over cricket and I wouldn't say I'm old considering Jimmy Anderson is 41 or something like that!

"Obviously I know they might want to go in a different direction and they're entitled to do whatever they think is the best way to move English cricket in the right direction. 

"I still feel I'm good enough and young enough to do it but that's out of my control, selection-wise."

Despite spending a long period ranked as the number one T20 batter in the world, and averaging 55 in ODI cricket, Malan has spent much of his time as an international player defending his methods against those who prefer more extravagant hitters.

And, as he turns his attention to mentoring others, he plans to learn from his own experiences.

"I guess I've never been someone who likes to be told what to do," he said.

"Whether it's by coaches or by the media, I feel it’s always been 'you have to play this way to be successful'. 

"But there's not just one way to score runs or win games of cricket. There's plenty of ways to score runs without being the stereotypical batter, put it that way.

"Hopefully that's enjoyable for me as well – putting in the work with guys and seeing how they can put that into practice.

"I know I'll have to be the guy that throws a thousand balls because I'm a player who demanded a thousand balls from the coaches when they're throwing at me."

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